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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

1 edition of Tellico Dam and Reservoir found in the catalog.

Tellico Dam and Reservoir

Robert K. Davis

Tellico Dam and Reservoir

a report

by Robert K. Davis

  • 250 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by The Office in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dams -- Tennessee -- Loudon County.,
  • Tellico Dam (Tenn.)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared for the Endangered Species Committee by the Office of Policy Analysis, U.S. Department of the Interior.
    ContributionsJohnson, F. Reed., United States. Dept. of the Interior. Office of Policy Analysis., United States. Endangered Species Interagency Committee.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination53 leaves in various foliations :
    Number of Pages53
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19685829M

    intermediate dam would threatoen the darter's survival and also reduce benefits. Abandoning the project without removing at least a portion of the dam would also threaten the darter's survival. If the Tellico reservior were conFleted, it would provide recreation, shoreline development, and flood control benefits. For fourteen years (–), archaeologists from the University of Tennessee conducted excavations and surveys in the Little Tennessee River Valley, which was being inundated by the TVA’s creation of the Tellico Reservoir. The project produced a wealth of new information about more t years of Native American history in the region.

    Digital Commons Citation. Davis, Robert K., "Tellico Dam and Reservoir: Staff Report to the Endangered Species Committee" (). Snail Darter Documents. The official public website of the Nashville District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For website corrections, write to [email protected]

    Video of the Novem reunion of the resisters of the Tennessee Valley Authority's Tellico Dam and Reservoir Project. Speakers include Zygmunt Plater, "Bill Evans", and Danny Pierce. Includes footage of reunion attendees watching national news coverage of the .   Tellico Reservoir, also known as Tellico Lake, is a reservoir in Tennessee, created by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in upon the completion of Tellico Dam. The dam impounds the Little Tennessee River and the lower Tellico River.


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Tellico Dam and Reservoir by Robert K. Davis Download PDF EPUB FB2

TVA and the Snail Darters: A Case Study in Environmental Management. by Teresa Sparks UTC Environmental Science Program. InTennessee Valley Authority (TVA) began construction on Tellico Dam and Reservoir book Tellico Dam and Reservoir project.

The goals of the project were to create hydroelectric power, promote shoreline development, provide recreational areas and serve as a means for flood control. Tellico Dam and the Snail Darter [Jim Thompson] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The definitive history of TVA's Tellico Dam project, announced in the early sixties and completed in the late seveties. The story centers on Charles Hall/5(3). The Tellico Dam case illustrates the United States' changing attitudes toward dams and the environment.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Construction of the dam was delayed when a small endangered fish called the snail darter was discovered on the Little Tennessee on: Loudon County, Tennessee, United States.

Tellico Village is located on approximately 4, acres of land that the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) purchased in the s and s as part of its Tellico Dam and Reservoir project. The reservoir covers approximat acres.

Cooper Communities, Inc. (CCI), acquired the property in Decemberand began. Tellico Dam and Reservoir Staff Report to the Endangered Species Committee. Janu -1, i "I I l ~~ EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ~he Endangered Species Committee has been called upon to deliberate on the case of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA's) Tellico Project and the endangered.

a 2, acre reservoir on the Tellico River, a tributary of the L'ittle Tennessee, and the alternative of leaving the reservoir area behind the Tellico Dam unflooded, but keeping the dam intact and operating it for flood control. Analysis of Alternatives.

Based on the complete record, River. Tellico Reservoir stretches 33 miles along the Little Tennessee River into the mountains of East Tennessee. The reservoir provides miles of shoreline acres of water surface for recreation activities.

Tellico has a flood-storage capacity ofacre-feet. Tellico Dam is not a hydroelectric facility. The Background Along the Little Tennessee River, the Tennessee Valley Authority began construction of the Tellico Dam and Reservoir Project in The Dam would bring jobs to the area and bring needed useful water to the area as opposed to the shallow and fast moving river the residents currently had.

The Tellico Dam is not powered by generators and produces no electricity, however, water flows through a short canal into Fort Loudoun Reservoir helping drive the four generating units at Fort Loudon Dam; Tellico Dam’s flood-storage capacity isacre-feet; Tellico Reservoir acres of surface water and miles of shoreline.

Pickwick Reservoir A popular waterskiing and fishing destination, Pickwick also offers a large campground with 92 sites below the dam. Pickwick Recreation Guide Tellico Reservoir offers plenty of day-use facilities, fishing areas and campgrounds around the reservoir. The snail darter controversy related to the discovery in of an endangered species during the construction of the Tellico Dam on the Little Tennessee River; the dam project had been authorized and begun before passage of protective environmental AugUniversity of Tennessee biologist and professor David Etnier discovered the snail darter in the Little Tennessee.

Tellico Reservoir, also known as Tellico Lake, is a reservoir in Tennessee, created by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in upon the completion of Tellico dam impounds the Little Tennessee River and the lower Tellico TVA is careful to refer to its artificial lakes as reservoirs (such as "Tellico Reservoir"), common usage tends to refer to the reservoir as "Tellico.

Angostura is one of the few large reservoirs in western South Dakota. The dam was built in by the Bureau of Reclamation across the Cheyenne River for irrigation purposes. The average depth of this reservoir is 29 feet and the deepest portion of the pool is 75 feet deep when full.

The lake's average summer temperature is 66 degrees F. Construction on Tellico Dam began inbut Tellico Lake or Reservoir wasn't completed until The reservoir was planned as an extension of Fort Loudoun Lake and is linked directly by canal. In when the dam was substantially completed, David Etnier discovered snail darters, a small endangered fish, in the waters of the section of.

The final dam on the river was Tellico that TVA started in Before Tellico Dam was completed 12 years later, it would become a national symbol in the bitter struggle between conservationists and developers. The battle over Tellico Dam made two trips to the U.S. Supreme Court and propelled a.

The Tellico Dam project called for a foot long, foot high concrete dam, a 2,foot long earthen dam and an foot long, foot canal connecting the new reservoir with the existing Fort Loudoun Reservoir.

[ Footnote 4 ] Tellico Dam itself will contain no electric generators; however, an interreservoir canal connecting Tellico Reservoir with a nearby hydroelectric plant will augment the latter's capacity.

[ Footnote 5 ] The NEPA injunction was in effect some 21 months; when it was entered TVA had spent some $29 million on the project. Most of. Book Now FAQ Contact Login. Tellico Lake About Tellico Lake.

Tellico Dam and Tellico Lake are part of an extension of the Fort Loudon project. The dam diverts water from the Little Tennessee River to Fort Loudon Lake rather than creating electricity. The Dam created a navigational waterway up the Little Tennessee River and offers access to.

Tellico Lake, Tennessee. Located in Tennessee, Tellico Lake real estate is the third largest market in the state for lake homes and lake lots.

The typical average list prices of Tellico Lake homes for sale is $, On average, there are lake homes for sale on Tellico Lake, and lake lots and parcels. Tellico is a cool water impoundment due to the cold water inflows from Chilhowee Reservoir and the Tellico River.

Since much of the reservoir is relatively infertile, it does not support high densities of fish. Some of the most common game fish include largemouth and smallmouth bass, white crappie, bluegill, rainbow trout, and walleye.

Tellico Dam itself will contain no electric generators; however, an inter-reservoir canal connecting Tellico Reservoir with a nearby hydroelectric plant will augment the latter's capacity.

The NEPA injunction was in effect some 21 months; when it was entered, TVA had spent some $29 million on. Fort Loudon, Tellico, Chilhowee, Calderwood, Cheoah and Fontana Dams 3 2 Monte Seymour.

Fontana Dam and Cheoah Dam Spilling Over - Jan. - Duration: Tellico Dam Controversy. Words8 Pages. It’s All About Giving a Dam “The dam and reservoir required the purchase of ab acres of land” This is the number that lies at the heart of a wound and a controversy that is deeply rooted in Eastern Tennessee.

While the number is large and significant, it is not the amount of land that was lost to the Tellico Dam project that caused the people .